Working Holiday Visa in Germany

About this visa

This visa helps young people come to Germany. You can generally apply for this visa if you have at least $5,500 USD to live on during your stay. While you’re here you can study and work while you enjoy your extended holiday of up to a year!


Participating countries

Germany has made Working Holiday visa agreements with the following 13 participating countries:

If you are a Citizen of Germany and are considering a Working Holiday experience in one of the participating countries above, contact the Embassy of the country in question for more information.


With this visa you can

This visa allows you to:

  • stay in Germany for up to one year
  • work for an employer for up to one year
  • visit other EU/Schengen Area countries during your Working Holiday visa period
  • leave and re-enter Germany any number of times while the visa is valid

Things to note

  • the Working Holiday visa in Germany is commonly referred to as the Youth Mobility visa
  • you can work for 12 months on either a minimum employment basis (less than EUR 450 per month) or up to 50 days per year as part of a full-time job
  • you are not allowed to commence work in Germany without a valid Working Holiday visa
  • you can only participate once

For Israelis

  • You can work for each employer up to three months
  • You can participate in training courses up to 6 months in duration

Conditions

You must pass the following requirements:

  • be a Citizen of one of the above Partner countries
  • be aged between 18 and 30 years old (up to and including 30); for Canadian Citizens the age limit is between 18 and 35 years old (up to and including 35)
  • not be accompanied by dependent family members (e.g. children)
  • your Passport must exceed the end of your stay by at least 3 months
  • have proof of health insurance valid in Germany (e.g. travel insurance for Germany) with coverage of at least €30,000 (EUR) including costs for medical evacuation/repatriation
  • show a recent bank statement (with full name) indicating proof of sufficient funds – up to $5,500 (USD) for the duration of your stay
  • pay the €75 (EUR) visa fee at time of visa application in Germany

Note: The visa conditions outlined above are subject to change without notice.


How to apply

  • Normal processing time: 1-2 weeks
  • Visa fee: 75 EUR

Most applicants must apply in person by the respective German Embassy in their home country prior to coming to Germany.

Applying upon arrival to Germany

If you are a Citizen of the following countries you can apply for the Working Holiday visa after entering Germany at the local immigration authority (Ausländerbehörde), these countries are:

  • Australia
  • Canada
  • Israel
  • Japan
  • New Zealand
  • United States of America

The Working Holiday visa can be issued on the same day as your appointment.

A map of local immigration authority offices (Ausländerbehörde) in Germany are below:

Link to Google Maps

Note: Even though you may be able to apply for a Working Holiday visa after entering Germany on a tourist visa the preferred method is still by contacting the German Embassy in your home country.

Applying from your home country

For Australians

Prepare your application as follows:

Go to: German Missions in Australia

For Canadians

Prepare your application as follows:

Go to: German Missions in Canada

For Israelis

Go to: German Embassy of Tel Aviv

For Japanese

Go to: German Consulate General in Japan

For New Zealanders

Prepare your application as follows:

Go to: German Embassy in Wellington

For Americans


Additional resources

Here are additional links and resources related to the Working Holiday visa in Germany. All resources are in English unless otherwise stated.

Australia

Canada

New Zealand

Israel


Need more help?

If you are seeking advice about Working Holiday visa's drop a comment below and we will be happy to answer any Working Holiday & Youth Mobility visa question you have! We are travellers too! 🙂

Ask a question below

16 thoughts on “Working Holiday Visa in Germany”

  1. Hi, Is it possible to apply for more than one Working Holiday Visa. For example, can I apply for the Tier 5 Youth Mobility Visa for the UK and then a month later apply for the Working Holiday Visa in Germany.

    Thanks

    1. Yes you can, there is no restriction on you staying the full visa duration in your first WHV country. Do note that the WHV starts the day it is issued in each country (12 months in UK, 12 months in DE, 12 months in DK, etc.).

      Where you’ll run into difficulty in Germany for instance is you can only get a WHV once you have registered your home address (Anmeldung), some hotels and hostels will sign this registration document for you so you can skip renting an apartment.

  2. Hello,
    I have Canadian citizenship but currently live in UK. I would just like to clarify what this note means:
    -you can work for 12 months on either a minimum employment basis (less than EUR 450 per month) or up to 50 days per year as part of a full-time job?

    I think the reason behind this is only to fund travels, and not to be employed full time earning more than 450 EUR?
    Thanks in advance.

    1. Hi M, that a condition that is applied to some passport countries so it’s best contacting a German Consulate in Canada and clarifying with them directly. It’s a confusing one.

      In my own situation I did not work for any German clients so it didn’t concern me, transitioning to a work visa (freelancer or small business visa) without the above restrictions is not difficult.

      The minimum employment basis (less than 450 EUR per month) is commonly called a “Mini job” contract as it exempts employee’s from having to pay income tax on their earnings and employers from having to pay social insurance, pension fund and wage tax costs.

      As a Working Holiday visa holder you are required to have valid private insurance for the duration of your stay. Let us know what you learn regarding that working hours condition and whether it is enforced.

      1. Wanting clarification on the mini jobs situation and €450 a month wage limit. There is no mention of this on any official government websites and other websites contradict each other.

        Applying from Australia, just not sure how one could be expected to live off €450 a month.

        Thanks

        1. Hi Russell, best to reach out to the Embassy/Consulate here in Australia to confirm this. 400 EUR is a fair bit to play with in most German cities – bar Munich and the high end of town – but I’d be keen to have this clarified for Australians so do let us know what you find out regarding this condition of the WHV.

  3. Hi, firstly thanks for the post it is really helpful. Btw I am a NZ citizen who just got the working holiday visa from March 1st and its a full year visa. However I was going to go to spain to meet my friends somewhere in Feb, so I was wondering if this can cause problems.. ?

    1. Hi Aaron, the day you commence your Working Holiday visa for Germany will be marked on the German residence visa document affixed to your passport. As a New Zealand Citizen you can enter Europe on a Schengen visa and are entitled to 90 days of unrestricted travel before you must transition to a residence visa from the country you are visiting. Check the entry dates on your residence visa and diviertete!

  4. hello! thanks for the information.
    i am from israel, and got already the “working holiday visa” in germany (valid until august 2019).
    my question is about finding work- i understand i can only work in a “holiday work” and not for every employer.
    can you tell me something about who can employ me and how?
    thank you!

    1. Hi Noam, thanks for asking. Each country has negotiated it’s own WHV conditions so I recommend you to contact the German Embassy or Consulate in Israel to clarify what those conditions are. Typically you can take any “mini-job” but not full-time employment, if your country has negotiated full-time employment conditions then it is usually restricted to a month or a fixed upper limit before you must transition to a standard resident work visa.

  5. Can I book a travel/health insurance once I’m in Germany just befor I go to the appointment to apply for the working holiday visa? Otherwise I’d book the insurance already befor arrival but when I go and apply for the visa after 2 months being in Germany I’m not fully covered for the whole year anymore that I could stay, right?

    1. Hi Sarah, yes you can book it just before your appointment but do check the visa conditions for your Schengen visa (tourist visa) as it may require you to have travel insurance as a condition of entering Germany. Also note that many travel insurance policies can only be applied for before leaving for your trip, this was the case for me here in Australia. I personally would not travel to Germany as a tourist without having travel insurance coverage or ensuring there is a bilateral agreement/free healthcare between Citizens of both countries.

  6. Thanks for all the info, really helpfu!

    I was wondering if it’s possible to apply for the German Working Holiday Visa if you don’t have an address, and are applying while on the road – we are thinking of traveling around Europe in a van first, and then looking at applying for the WHV.

    Thanks!

    1. Hi Shannon, a requirement of the Youth Mobility/Working Holiday visa in Germany that catches a lot of visitors out is that you must have a signed resident form completed by your landlord/owner of the property you are residing at. This is okay for your needs to keep traveling but you will need to convince a hostel to let you use their address as without this you will not be issued a residence visa.

      In my own case my hostel provided their address and I confirmed with immigration that once I had rented an apartment I would return and update my documentation, that never happened and it was never followed up! Hope this helps.

  7. If I were to get a Working Holiday Visa in Germany, but continue to work part time remotely for an Australian company, would that be allowed? Or would I have to apply for a different visa? Or pay tax within Germany for the money earnt?

    1. Hi Lisa, I operated my own business (e-Commerce) from Australia while on my German Working Holiday visa without issue; no tax issues either. The Youth Mobility visa as it’s called in Germany offers visa holders the ability to work in Germany to suppliment their costs of living but you can choose not to. Assuming you’re an Australian Citizen you can apply for your Working Holiday visa upon arrival to Germany, just book a flight, find suitable accomodation, register your address with local council then apply for a Working Holiday visa from your nearest immigration office. We’re here to help, enjoy your adventure! I hope this helps! 🙂

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